Comments on: Cold Buttered Rum http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/ The International Culinary Center's Tech 'N Stuff Blog Thu, 09 Jan 2014 18:17:16 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/#comment-1968 Fri, 22 Jan 2010 13:57:12 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1040#comment-1968 Hi Galin,
I haven’t had any problems. Both xanthan and gum arabic are fairly pH tolerant. I had a friend of mine have trouble with fresh pineapple juice once, but I couldn’t replicate the problem. The great thing about Gum Arabic (and why it is good for this application) is that it can be massivly diluted without breaking. I just looked up the Giffard. It has gum arabic but also orange flower water. Where do you live? Maybe I know a supplier of straight gum arabic.

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By: galin http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/#comment-1967 Fri, 22 Jan 2010 02:46:42 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1040#comment-1967 Hi Dave
I’ve always wanted to try and make your butter syrup but could not find Gum Arabic. However i’ve got some Xanthan gum and now am thinking of replacing the sugar in your recipe with Gome Syrup made by Giffard. i am not really sure how to work out the measurements but what worries me more is will the butter syrup precipitate when shaken with lime juice?

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By: Kane http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/#comment-1966 Fri, 08 Jan 2010 05:20:51 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1040#comment-1966 I thought as much. My supplier no longer has any gum arabic. I really want to try this out, looks like I’ll just have to keep on searching.

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By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/#comment-1965 Thu, 07 Jan 2010 16:28:04 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1040#comment-1965 Hi Kane,
I’d think you’d need to use so much xanthan to do it that the drink texture would be compromised. Xanthan/Gum Arabic is a stabilizer/emulsifier combo. If you used only xanthan you’d be doing it with a stabilizer only. Gum arabic can be bought at pastry supply shops or online (unless you don’t want to use it for ethical reasons).

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By: Kane http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/#comment-1964 Thu, 07 Jan 2010 15:08:11 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1040#comment-1964 Would straight xanthan have a chance of working in the same manner?

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By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/#comment-1963 Fri, 10 Jul 2009 22:20:25 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1040#comment-1963 They are very similar. Both will work.

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By: Moody http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/#comment-1962 Fri, 10 Jul 2009 21:31:48 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1040#comment-1962 Is it 310 S or 210 S you all are using? It says both in your blog (typo maybe?) Is there a difference in the two? I got the 310 S, will that work? 310 is a blend of Gum Acacia and Xanthan Gum as well

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By: JK http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/#comment-1961 Sat, 04 Jul 2009 17:24:40 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1040#comment-1961 Got the TIC sample, tried it. Butter taste wasn’t spot on. I used Danish Lurpark, expensive, since I had that in my fridge.

Which do you use?

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By: Evan http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/#comment-1960 Fri, 19 Jun 2009 16:16:03 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1040#comment-1960 With the Methocel products acting as an emulsifier I have noticed something as well. I used the Methocel to make sheeted Sauce RĂ©moulade for a contest, when I made the mayonnaise base, then added the Methocel, I noticed that the emulsion sauce would not break for days, but I concluded this was cause by the full hydration of the Methocel binding to the added water in the recipe. I viewed it similar to the way gelatin forms helical junctions when the mixture cools. So, the meshwork of Methocel created a strong net the would capture the fat molecules and keep the sauce from breaking away from the added water. What do you think?

We have discussed the use of the word “additive” when it comes food. I used it because I thought the context called for it. The fact that through esterfication the once natural compounds are made un-natural. Clearly this is not a good word, because I did not know that about Methocel products, and I stand by them. I renounce my previous statement using that word and shall never use again!

As Nils explained in the “molecular gastronomy” post, and our discussion at the FCI, you cannot use “additive” in low quality food, and then say it is an ingredient in haute cuisine. So the process of making these amazing products will take what was once natural about them out of the picture. The fact is that these ingredients are crucial to making new culinary ideas come to life, and the fact that we eat many of these ingredients in everyday life proves there is no harm in them. What would you say if there was a problem with someone due to the consumption of one of these altered ingredients? Would you say this would be the point of calling it an “additive” because there was a negative effect from the ingredient?

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By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/16/cold-buttered-rum/#comment-1959 Fri, 19 Jun 2009 03:52:50 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1040#comment-1959 Yeah, that’s what makes it non-natural. I don’t use it much just cause I never got in the habit. I think PGA is expensive now (that’s what the tech guy at TIC gums told me) so some industrial types are shying away as well. I don’t know why PGA acts like an emulsifier. I also know some Methocels have some emulsifying ability but don’t know why. For me the difference between additive and ingredient is comes from why you use it. Methocel F-50 is not a naturally occuring compound, but we use it to achieve culinary effects we otherwise couldn’t, so I don’t consider it an additive. What do you think?

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