Comments on: Crème Anglaise: Sous-Vide vs. Low Temp http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/ The International Culinary Center's Tech 'N Stuff Blog Thu, 09 Jan 2014 18:17:16 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/#comment-73494 Tue, 09 Aug 2011 19:40:23 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1210#comment-73494 Howdy,
65 C is more than plenty to pasteurize the egg yolks, but they won’t thicken up at those temps in an anglaise base (at least not in a reasonable amount of time). Egg yolks will be just set at 64 C when cooked in the shell. Out of shell yolks appear to set higher. Mixed with sugar, salt, milk and cream they set higher still. 82 won’t produce an eggy taste providing you don’t cook too long. 15 minutes and the anglaise is nappant -20-22 minutes and it is thick. Any longer and the sauce does get eggy, especially if there is air in the bag. Lower temps (like 65 C) will provide the totally clean taste like Sam Mason used to make at WD50 and Tailor, but the base won’t be as thick as a traditional anglaise.
the 160 F number for pasteurization is for instant pasteurization (like 15 seconds). 65 C is fine when you are cooking for minutes.

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/#comment-73493 Tue, 09 Aug 2011 19:35:55 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1210#comment-73493 Oliver, throw the pods into the bag when you cook the anglaise. Remove them after you cut open the bag.

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By: Oliver http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/#comment-62789 Tue, 19 Jul 2011 02:51:40 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1210#comment-62789 Doesn’t cooking the creme anglaise at 82 C will make the ice cream base taste eggy? because egg yolks coagulate at 72 C, and heating them to 82 C will give it egginess that we don’t want.
Now, cooking it at 65 C like in the fat ducks will post a problem too. Cooking eggs at 65 C will not destroy the Salmonella; they must be cooked to a temperature of at least 160°F (71°C) which will make it eggy. I’m confused!

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By: Oliver http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/#comment-62757 Tue, 19 Jul 2011 01:59:09 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1210#comment-62757 According to the recipe (Courtesy of PolyScience): 1 vanilla bean, split in half and seeds
removed, pods and seeds reserved. What do I with the reserved pods & seeds?

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By: Chris Narvaez http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/#comment-2046 Tue, 30 Jun 2009 09:38:51 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1210#comment-2046 I’m trying to develop a sort of gnocchi of anglaise that is pipped out of a bag onto a sugared surface, brulee’d. However, I’m failing in recognizing the point where anglaise becomes a ‘set’ custard. Have you the time to suggest pointer in the matter?

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By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/#comment-2045 Fri, 26 Jun 2009 21:34:03 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1210#comment-2045 Anglaise is cooked at a high enough temperature to kill whatever is in the bag (but not to sterilize spores). When we use ziplocs, which we do a lot, we submerge the bag under water so that the displaced air doesn’t want to creep back in. Only the very corner is open and out of the water.

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By: jk http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/#comment-2044 Fri, 26 Jun 2009 04:11:34 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1210#comment-2044 I think since its fluid the foodsaver may suck out the creme as well.

Grant Achatz demoed a sous vide tuerkey at home, he just pushed the air out with his hands and that seemed to do the trick for him.

What I am wondering with the Anglaise is, what happens with bacteria? I thought to kill those I actually do a quick sear to sous vide meats?

Will freezing kill them off as well? What happens if I want to do creme brulee?

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By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/#comment-2043 Fri, 26 Jun 2009 03:14:16 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1210#comment-2043 Interesting questions. The next time I teach a sous vide class I’ll try to remember to de-aerate and put one in a ziploc to test. I’ll report back.

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By: Chuck Jacobs http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/#comment-2042 Thu, 25 Jun 2009 22:36:00 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1210#comment-2042 Do you think the difference between the sous-vide version and the Ziploc version was because of the de-aerating the from the vacuum machine? Or do you think the vacuum somehow altered the base in some other way? (or that the ziploc was unable to completely remove the air). For those of us with just a wimpy FoodSaver, I wonder if you could de-aerate the base first in one of the sturdy vacuum canisters before sealing it in a bag? Oh how I wish I had the means to test for myself!

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By: sygyzy http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/06/24/creme-anglaise-sous-vide-vs-low-temp/#comment-2041 Wed, 24 Jun 2009 23:40:54 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1210#comment-2041 What happens if you don’t haev a commercial vacuum chamber and only get “most” of the air out using a Foodsaver? Will this still work?

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