Comments on: Just another flavor separation technique http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/ The International Culinary Center's Tech 'N Stuff Blog Thu, 09 Jan 2014 18:17:16 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: gwen http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/#comment-2413 Fri, 14 Aug 2009 18:45:37 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1624#comment-2413 red miso, egg yolk, different types of truffles, cumin.

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By: chris http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/#comment-2412 Thu, 13 Aug 2009 07:51:21 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1624#comment-2412 what about the citrus notes from different hops? or maybe like pinky came up with on “Pinky and the Brain,” make pencils that taste like bacon, or even bacon that tastes like pencil’s.

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By: fooducation http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/#comment-2411 Thu, 06 Aug 2009 08:04:17 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1624#comment-2411 I’d term chromatography in the kitchen among the more hard core techniques :) Removing off-flavours, such as oxidised fatty acids from rancid oil (might be put in the category of misuse, though).

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By: LRC http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/#comment-2410 Thu, 06 Aug 2009 03:51:50 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1624#comment-2410 heatless habanero is a no-brainer. the one thing that countercurrent chromatography is really best at is “chemical subtraction”, i.e. remove only specific compound(s) from highly complex mixtures. just pull out the capsaicinoids and you have heatless habanero.
“assuming things don’t go horribly wrong for unforeseen reasons” is not anything I like to think about. just make it work and it will work.

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By: Paul A. http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/#comment-2409 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 18:54:58 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1624#comment-2409 On another (floral) note, this looks like a technology with culinary potential:
http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2009-08/news-flash-land-oktoberfest-longer-lasting-brews

A polymer is custom-designed to bond with one specific molecule (in this case riboflavin). Dip the polymer in beer and it pulls out all the free riboflavin (which otherwise can react to light and produce off-flavors).

Presumably the same technique could create custom polymers to extract any molecule you like.

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By: JohnTheBastard http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/#comment-2408 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 18:12:36 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1624#comment-2408 I want just the fruity front-palette flavor you get from Moroccan cured olives.

I also would be excited to get some heatless habeñero.

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By: Luke Pro http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/#comment-2407 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 16:41:24 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1624#comment-2407 In response to Jeremiah. If you were to pump whiskey through flavorless oil the whiskey flavors would “stick” to the oil to varying degrees. As the whiskey comes through the oil the whiskey flavors will come out in “fractions.” (assuming things don’t go horribly wrong for unforeseen reasons) In other words, the flavor compounds would be separated in a spectrum based on how “sticky” they are to the oil. (ie the stickier they are the longer it will take for them to come out) To do it right, this experiment would require extra whiskey and shot glasses. Salute!

And Jeffje, I think you are onto something with your thoughts on the maillard flavors. It turns out CCC can separate them from other flavors quite well because they are very polar compared to most other flavors.

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By: jeffje http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/#comment-2406 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 06:40:09 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1624#comment-2406 vanilla, toasted almond (or anything with maillard flavors, really), peach, blue cheese, and durian all come to mind.

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By: Jeremiah Blatz http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/#comment-2405 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 03:40:19 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1624#comment-2405 You could presumably make the “perfect” whiskey (different for everyone). This only works if you can isolate the compounds in the non-oil portion. Could you put cheap whiskey in one end, flavorless oil in the other, then use distillation to recover the broken-out “piano keys” from the oil?

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By: rachey http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/03/just-another-flavor-separation-technique/#comment-2404 Tue, 04 Aug 2009 03:06:49 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1624#comment-2404 i want to see soy sauce!

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