Comments on: Cocktail Science IV: All-Star Shake-off at Pegu Club Testing Shaking Differences Between Bartenders Qualitatively http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/ The International Culinary Center's Tech 'N Stuff Blog Thu, 09 Jan 2014 18:17:16 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: jschwartz http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/#comment-2480 Sun, 06 Dec 2009 17:36:34 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1749#comment-2480 I’m not sure I understand your/ the article’s stance on the textural aspects of the cocktail. ice crystals and aeration, while not the most important aspect of a drink add a textural component as enjoyable and satisfying when well achieved as any counterpart in food. Many a chef would cringe to read words diminishing the value of texture and mouth feel in food. If it is so inconsequential, why all the whipping, meringues, mousses, purees, foams etc.? surely the answer isn’t artistry alone; mere presentation.

A drink with equal dilution and temperature but none of these qualities would be to me as a delicious but tough steak.

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By: ian root http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/#comment-2479 Sun, 08 Nov 2009 22:56:36 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1749#comment-2479 Hi,
I’m a bartender at the Oberon Grill out in Eureka CA, after having made my way here from NYC. I am grateful to have found your postings on the science of certain heretofore overly simplified/underdiscussed areas of mixology. While there is much artistry involved in the craft, there also much science within the artistry and I am thankful for your rewarding inquiries so far in this regard.

Hopefully, while happily lapping up intel, I can here and there offer something of value back to the discussion.
And so here goes a coupla things- vis. shaking vigor, length of shake and aperture of gate discussion:
1) I have percieved (and maybe just in my own deluded and self-serving mind) a benefit from longer and fairly vigorous shakes of cocktails which have the addition of what i’ll call ‘bountifully concieved’ liqueurs, i.e.- Benedictine, Chartreuse and the like… I have long suspected that there are cogeners and/or other elements within them that become active positive factors in the finished cocktail either directly through taste/aroma or texture (or both) only after suffering the extra friction and micro-oxidation that may achieved through longer and more monkey-like shakes.
…Crazy?

2) Often cocktails, esp. the ones intimated above, involve the inclusion of fresh lemon or lime juices. I presume that, aside from their varying influences on aroma and flavor, these ingredients serve the primary function of providing acidity to the cocktail. Acidity, as I understand it, is a fairly volatile quality when present in liquid- tending to want to escape local confinement as soon as possible through aromatization. Wouldn’t, then, vigorous shaking have a tendency to reduce the overall acidity of a cocktail, esp. in the case of ones involving fresh lemon/lime juices?….. implying, then, a fairly direct way for the bartender to manage the role of acid/acidity in their cocktails… Maybe perhaps?…. Or maybe perhaps silly?

Thanks again to all involved in the creation and continued growth of this resource.

i root
eureka ca

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By: Jacqueline Church http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/#comment-2478 Tue, 25 Aug 2009 15:42:19 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1749#comment-2478 Ah Nils, a tough job you have there…! I’ll have to ask Tom about that conical strainer tonight at Craigie..

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By: Tom Schlesinger-Guidelli http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/#comment-2477 Mon, 24 Aug 2009 15:17:54 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1749#comment-2477 Very interesting article. I’m glad you are taking this as seriously as you have taken your food posts. I was surprised to see that a technique many of us implement wasn’t used here. Why aren’t you using a conical strainers in addition to the classic Hawthorne strainer? It would completely extract the “open gate, closed gate, half gate” variable within this discussion.

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By: Tomek http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/#comment-2476 Fri, 21 Aug 2009 09:42:38 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1749#comment-2476 Another great experiment. Please keep them coming! This is pioneering work!

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By: nilsnoren http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/#comment-2475 Thu, 20 Aug 2009 18:51:20 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1749#comment-2475 Howdy, Yes they were.

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By: Chris Amirault http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/#comment-2474 Thu, 20 Aug 2009 16:36:31 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1749#comment-2474 Excellent, again, gentlemen. Did you measure dilution percentages? Eyeballing they look like they are around the canonical 25%….

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By: slkinsey http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/#comment-2473 Thu, 20 Aug 2009 16:03:16 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1749#comment-2473 Was everyone happy with the amount of ice in the shaker? In my opinion and experience, different bertender preferences, shakers and shaking styles also tend to be developed to go along with different volumes (not to mention sizes) of ice.

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By: Gonçalo http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/#comment-2472 Thu, 20 Aug 2009 01:10:36 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1749#comment-2472 some further helpful post on shaking theory. and a confirmation, so far, that shaking method does not tend to make the difference. probably the different straining methods are far more distinguishable.

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By: Laren http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/08/19/cocktail-science-pegu-club/#comment-2471 Wed, 19 Aug 2009 19:18:40 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1749#comment-2471 Had I known you had a “crazy monkey shake” up your sleeves, I would have insisted on video for the Savory Cities interview!

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