Comments on: Pressed Duck: A Photo Diary http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/ The International Culinary Center's Tech 'N Stuff Blog Thu, 09 Jan 2014 18:17:16 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: Kevin Power http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/#comment-276804 Wed, 13 Jun 2012 01:25:17 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1855#comment-276804 It’s hard to believe that this method of butchering an animal is considered Haute Cuisine, when so many Europeans are against the Seal Hunt in Eastern Canada. Strangle or suffocate a Duck is acceptable and kill a seal is barbaric. double standard, no doubt.

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/#comment-13802 Mon, 24 Jan 2011 15:13:55 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1855#comment-13802 We’ve also done it completely traditionally. I disagree about the bag.

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By: David Soohoo http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/#comment-13432 Tue, 18 Jan 2011 17:05:02 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1855#comment-13432 I think the technique is simply not the best…should marinate, roast for caramelization, and then slice off hindquarters and breasts…make the sauce using the blood to thicken duck stock, wine, red currant jelly, et cetera for great tasting sauce…
cooking in bag does not create great flavors…

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By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/#comment-2527 Sat, 13 Feb 2010 03:11:37 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1855#comment-2527 Awesome Erik,
Please post a link if you have it. The ducks are killed normally?

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By: erik http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/#comment-2526 Thu, 11 Feb 2010 02:14:59 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1855#comment-2526 We do a Canard Presse at my restaurant. It is quite popular! We prick the skin and poach the whole duck in boiling h20 for 1 min. Then let the skin dry and form a pellacle overnight. We roast it after letting it come to room temp, to rare on the breasts. The duck is presented, then brought back to the kitchen where the breasts are removed, the legs are put back in the oven, and the carcass and liver is put in the can of the press. A server presses the carcass in to a small copper pot and that is brought back to the kitchen where I make a sauce. I emulsify foie gras in to it and pass it through a chinois, finish it with salt, pepper, vinegar….the vinegar and foie take the place of butter and wine/liquor. It is served in 2 courses. Our ducks still retain enough blood to make the traditional sauce au sang. Delicious!

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By: Adam http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/#comment-2525 Tue, 15 Sep 2009 16:44:07 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1855#comment-2525 been cooking ducks( both magret and pekin) sous vide for a few years now, results have been great even at a lower temp. I agree that too long results in poor texture and a liverish taste but i think that is common among most meats cooked sous vide ( the texture part) to medium rare. I can only imagine that not bleeding results in poor taste, and stress results in bad texture; are there any meats that are meant to be eaten before being bled?

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By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/#comment-2524 Mon, 14 Sep 2009 17:13:52 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1855#comment-2524 Howdy Asbel,
Normally, we do duck sous-vide at 57 (sometimes 58 for tough breeds) for 45 minutes, then let it cool, and sear off the skin as per normal. This is more sous-vide to insure the center of the breast is exactly where we want it. We love the results. Duck cooked a lot longer than that goes liver-y and loses its nice color. I think the bloody duck should be served more on the medium side. One of the ducks was Pekin. Don’t know about the other.

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By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/#comment-2523 Mon, 14 Sep 2009 17:10:22 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1855#comment-2523 Patricio,
Sorry. The post should have read 57. This duck was no good at medium rare. I haven’t done any other tests with rare un-bled meat. The unbled striped bass in our ike-jime tests, however, tasted awful raw but not as bad cooked. Maybe there is a pattern?

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By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/#comment-2522 Mon, 14 Sep 2009 17:08:27 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1855#comment-2522 The traditional recipe calls for a quick roast at high heat on a small duck. It is possible not to overcook it at this step, but the next step is to slice the breast very thinly and heat it in the sauce –invariably overcooking it (by our standards). I think that this type of duck just ain’t so good medium rare.

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By: Dave A http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/09/02/pressed-duck-a-photo-diary/#comment-2521 Mon, 14 Sep 2009 17:06:43 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=1855#comment-2521 HaHa.
Hi Chad,
We have many chefs who speak French. We didn’t have any there at the time. I would say it was some serious compression. Cheapo thousand-dollar french press….

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