Comments on: Scotch and Peanuts in the Centrifuge = Some Funky Stuff. http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/10/23/scotch-and-peanuts-in-the-centrifuge-some-funky-stuff/ The International Culinary Center's Tech 'N Stuff Blog Thu, 09 Jan 2014 18:17:16 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/10/23/scotch-and-peanuts-in-the-centrifuge-some-funky-stuff/#comment-18218 Wed, 13 Apr 2011 17:45:22 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=2350#comment-18218 I agree.

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By: Charlie http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/10/23/scotch-and-peanuts-in-the-centrifuge-some-funky-stuff/#comment-16807 Sun, 13 Mar 2011 14:57:32 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=2350#comment-16807 This combination is perfectly logical to me. In fact, let’s call it the third and final permutation of a “holy trinity”. We have scotch, we peanuts, and we have butter. Only two of the three possible combinations thereof have been popularized thus far: butterscotch and peanutbutter. So, why in the name of common decency has nobody til now come up with the obvious peanutscotch? Makes perfect scents to me ;)

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By: rageahol http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/10/23/scotch-and-peanuts-in-the-centrifuge-some-funky-stuff/#comment-2690 Sun, 01 Nov 2009 05:29:45 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=2350#comment-2690 the simple syrup thing is interesting. in the lab we frequently use a sucrose gradient to separate proteins by size/weight, i think because it forms a good, cheap matrix to retard the movement of larger particles. kind of like gelatin, i suppose, but i think that because the molecules are smaller so are the “holes” . perhaps that’s what’s going on here.

I don’t recall ever using ethanol to perform the same kind of separation. ethanol is less dense than water, and way less dense than simple syrup, so i don’t think it’s a usable replacement.

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By: schinderhannes http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/10/23/scotch-and-peanuts-in-the-centrifuge-some-funky-stuff/#comment-2689 Wed, 28 Oct 2009 09:28:29 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=2350#comment-2689 glad my hypothesis worked out so well!

Love your blog, even though I comment far too rarely!

Allow me to go of topic a bit:
What is your rotavap project doing?
I wish you all the best with it even though I am a bit sceptic :-( Dunno if the magnetic drive will do the trick.

I thought about alternatives but I guess a falling film evaporator is out of range LOL

One device that might be ultra cool is made by the Swiss company Buchi: the “Syncore Polyvap” is a parallel evaporator for up to 96 samples (not really what you need) but there is one configuration with 4 samples in parallel and they are 500 mls each (basically giant test tubes with a very wide mouth, more or less a round bottom pint glass) easy to fill and empty and clean… check it out….

Link below
TTFN
Schinderhannes

http://www.buchi.com/Syncore-Polyvap.221.0.html?&no_cache=1&file=114&uid=38903

diclaimer: I have nothing to do with Buchi, but workin in a research lab using some of their stuff.

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By: Marcus Abernathy http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/10/23/scotch-and-peanuts-in-the-centrifuge-some-funky-stuff/#comment-2688 Mon, 26 Oct 2009 03:11:12 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=2350#comment-2688 You cad! The side-by-sides made me spit my milk! You are, without a doubt, the truest hero of every peanut and scotch lover.

The highly alcoholic peanut butter (with no scotch taste) has some truly intriguing possibilities…

– Marc

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By: Paul A. http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/10/23/scotch-and-peanuts-in-the-centrifuge-some-funky-stuff/#comment-2687 Fri, 23 Oct 2009 14:36:44 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=2350#comment-2687 I would have done the job for peanuts.

Glad you’re back in working order!

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