Comments on: Pressure Cooked Stock 2: Changing Pressures, Playing with Chemistry http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/ The International Culinary Center's Tech 'N Stuff Blog Thu, 09 Jan 2014 18:17:16 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/#comment-280406 Wed, 27 Jun 2012 12:25:59 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=3243#comment-280406 Howdy Neil,
Non-electric pressure cookers all use pressure as their regulating mechanism because it is so much more robust and easy to do than a non-electric temperature control. The only drawback, as you say, is that you have to know the atmospheric boiling point at your current elevation.

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/#comment-280402 Wed, 27 Jun 2012 12:16:02 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=3243#comment-280402 Howdy. It looks to be non venting. It looks like the standard Kuhn Rikon valve –a spring-loaded plunger in the center of the lid (same as I have on mine) –they don’t vent.

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By: hugo http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/#comment-280391 Tue, 26 Jun 2012 11:23:12 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=3243#comment-280391 Great (cooking) science! Thank you for all this useful information.

Does anybody here know if the Kuhn Rikon Duromatic line (somewhat cheaper)is also non-venting? Do they perform the same?

Thank you very much brothers and sisters!

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By: Neil http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/#comment-262893 Tue, 22 May 2012 15:25:17 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=3243#comment-262893 Instead of testing by psi, using a temperature probe to compare stocks with will get you more consistent results, like if you travel to a different altitude. what I mean is that instead of educated guessing a little over 15 psi as ideal you could say 251.3 degrees is ideal for stock which is more accurate.

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/#comment-76595 Wed, 17 Aug 2011 12:12:27 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=3243#comment-76595 My memory is that that they are as gelatinous as regular long cooked stock. I don’t think the pressure cooker hydrolyzes too much gelatin (although it does a bang up job of breaking collagen into gelatin).

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By: chuck http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/#comment-76197 Tue, 16 Aug 2011 21:19:33 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=3243#comment-76197 Dave, curious as to how gelatinous the pressure cooker stocks were? I’d assume they wouldn’t be.

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/#comment-76056 Tue, 16 Aug 2011 13:29:30 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=3243#comment-76056 I spoke to Chris Young about this briefly. When you are canning for canning’s sake, I believe you leave the lids loose. If you were going for non venting, you’d have to pre-tighten the lids. In this case you should only use natural pressure release and you might not be able to trust the sterilization. People who use canners as sterilizers are very careful about venting steam from the unit prior to sealing to remove dry air from the unit before. The theory is that dry ai can remain in pockets and prevent total sterilization. Don’t know if that is true. I’m sure that in canning you can get around this by cooking a bit longer (but I don’t have data). You won’t get the vacuum seal as confirmation of a good job done.

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By: Joshua http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/#comment-75871 Tue, 16 Aug 2011 03:59:46 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=3243#comment-75871 Regarding venting in cans in the PC, isn’t it the case that the cans still vent as the liquid in the cans boils off? That’s why the cans seal when they cool, right?

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/#comment-74980 Sat, 13 Aug 2011 11:29:34 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=3243#comment-74980 Don’t you think the cloudiness is cause by some sort of saponification reaction?

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By: AcidFlask http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/01/27/pressure-cooked-stock-2-changing-pressures-playing-with-chemistry/#comment-74879 Sat, 13 Aug 2011 04:05:58 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=3243#comment-74879 Congratulations! I believe you have just rediscovered the Hofmeister effect, where salt causes dissolved proteins to precipitate. I would venture to guess that you will get similar cloudiness by adding enough salt. I somehow doubt that 45 min in a pressure cooker is enough to chemically break enough peptide bonds in the protein to make that much of a difference.

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