Comments on: Cocktail Science in General: Part 1 of 2 http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/ The International Culinary Center's Tech 'N Stuff Blog Thu, 09 Jan 2014 18:17:16 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: Eleanor http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/#comment-8587 Sun, 10 Oct 2010 17:15:36 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4585#comment-8587 Wow, I knew that somehow I could combine my engineering degree and love of alcohol! Well done, fellows!

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/#comment-8394 Thu, 07 Oct 2010 00:53:51 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4585#comment-8394 Cool, thanks.

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By: fedward http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/#comment-8383 Wed, 06 Oct 2010 15:57:10 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4585#comment-8383 This whole series is great. But where were you when I asked this question on Metafilter?

http://ask.metafilter.com/110450/Small-Ice-vs-Big-Ice

I’ve asked the Metafilter mods to post a link to this URL and mark my old question as resolved, but I haven’t seen any activity on that yet.

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By: Dominik MJ http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/#comment-7905 Wed, 22 Sep 2010 11:10:01 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4585#comment-7905 Great – really great post. I came across this subject already quite a while – but I am pretty dumb about science and there were a lot of assumptions.

Now I got proof!

Very good work!

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By: j schwartz http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/#comment-7721 Sun, 12 Sep 2010 03:09:45 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4585#comment-7721 excellent! thanks for the effort. This answers most of the questions/variables I had after the initial experiments.

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By: eric rodriguez http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/#comment-7646 Thu, 09 Sep 2010 17:08:23 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4585#comment-7646 I would love to see some of these experiments repeated with salty drinks to see how much the electrolyte concentration drops the equilibrium temperature of the drinks.

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By: Rachel http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/#comment-7623 Thu, 09 Sep 2010 05:07:05 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4585#comment-7623 Culinology Article on Cocktails –
http://www.culinologyonline.com/articles/mixology-made-easy.html

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By: Tomek Roehr http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/#comment-7527 Sat, 04 Sep 2010 18:46:39 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4585#comment-7527 Absolutely wonderful stuff you’re doing. Can’t wait to see you at Bar Convent Berlin. Na Zdrowie!

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/#comment-7496 Sat, 04 Sep 2010 13:18:38 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4585#comment-7496 Hey Erin,
Re the diluted drink, wait for Part 2.
Freezing point depression isn’t enough to explain why the drink gets colder than zero as you shake it. For instance, many oils have a very low freezing point but if you put an ice cube in them they will only go down to 0 degrees because there is no mixing. The freezing point depression of the fluid and the chilling of the drink is due to a shift in the balance between entropy and enthalpy in the equation governing the melting of the ice.

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/09/02/cocktail-science-in-general-part-1-of-2/#comment-7494 Sat, 04 Sep 2010 13:11:14 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4585#comment-7494 Several years ago (like 4 or 5), someone whose name escapes me at CP Kelco developed a freeze-thaw stable gellan ice cube. Presumably the gellan cubes would provide the heat of fusion benefits of normal ice without much dilution. The problem is the liquified water that melts inside the cube isn’t mobile and I think chilling would be inefficient. Not sure though.

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