Comments on: Happy Thanksgiving. Don’t Poison Your Family. http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/ The International Culinary Center's Tech 'N Stuff Blog Thu, 09 Jan 2014 18:17:16 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/#comment-13803 Mon, 24 Jan 2011 15:14:27 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4904#comment-13803 Which Guy?

]]>
By: Dan Elgart http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/#comment-13441 Tue, 18 Jan 2011 20:21:58 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4904#comment-13441 I lost my thread or link to the do it yourself sous vide (immersion circulator ) guy with the pictures a plenty, and instructions. Can you help me?

]]>
By: Bruce Wood http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/#comment-13198 Fri, 14 Jan 2011 14:00:35 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4904#comment-13198 PS hate to sound like gloating but we also have two heritage poultry farmers on the Island.

Bruce

]]>
By: Bruce Wood http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/#comment-13197 Fri, 14 Jan 2011 13:59:13 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4904#comment-13197 last time we did stuffing at work we formed it inot a roll and wrapped it in caul fat then buttered foil. After cooking and cooling you can cut in hockey puck sized slices and fry it in butter/duck fat (or schmaltz) to brown and crisp it. Then use it as a base to plate the rest of the bird on.

]]>
By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/#comment-10182 Tue, 30 Nov 2010 01:52:33 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4904#comment-10182 I hardly, if ever, use a torch for crisping things up. The butane torches tend to be better than the propane. I’m pretty sure it is the Mercaptans they add to the fuel that stink up foods and lead to torch taste. The butane torches seem to be better at combusting that stuff.

]]>
By: schenck http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/#comment-10168 Mon, 29 Nov 2010 17:02:44 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4904#comment-10168 Not sure if this is the best place to post this, but it might be of interest:

Thermodynamics of Pie Crust

http://lablemminglounge.blogspot.com/2006/11/phase-equilibria-of-pie-crust.html

And an update
http://lablemminglounge.blogspot.com/2010/11/pie-crust-phase-equilibria-update.html

]]>
By: MattinLosAngeles http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/#comment-10129 Mon, 29 Nov 2010 00:27:07 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4904#comment-10129 A semi-thread hijack question. Reading back through last year’s post, I understand why you favor hot-fat ladling over torching for skin-crisping. But I’m curious: do you “sear” with torch for finishing meats without skins, like steaks or pork?

]]>
By: kate http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/#comment-10040 Fri, 26 Nov 2010 20:43:25 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4904#comment-10040 In the midst of the recent news of water bottles and receipts containing BPA (go ahead and google it), I wouldn’t be surprised if plastics themselves are found to contain cancer-causing elements. Sorry, I refuse to cook in anything plastic; hard, flexible, or otherwise. And I definitely do not microwave. Even if it turns out to be “safe,” you’re still zapping out all the nutrients that are in the food. And isn’t that the point of eating?

]]>
By: Sousvidist http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/#comment-10030 Fri, 26 Nov 2010 14:36:13 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4904#comment-10030 One of my cookbooks (The Best Recipe by Cooks Illustrated) recommended microwaving stuffing just before filling it into the turkey. They wanted it hotter than is comfortable to hold in your hand-they don’t give a specific temperature. Their logic, if I understand, is that if the stuffing is warmer at the core say 120 F or more, then then it has a head start over the turkey which may be at room temperature. Although the temperature of the stuffing will fall until heat penetrates the cavity, it may stay insulated and not require as much heat gain to get the stuffing to start cooking and the stuffing stays in a somewhat in a better heat zone for safety. I think next time I will try the sous vide method to get similar results.

]]>
By: Well http://www.cookingissues.com/2010/11/24/happy-thanksgiving-dont-poison-your-family/#comment-10009 Fri, 26 Nov 2010 02:48:53 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?p=4904#comment-10009 Dave,

You’re a pretty rad guy.

]]>