Comments on: Part I. Introduction to Low-Temperature Cooking and Sous-Vide http://www.cookingissues.com The International Culinary Center's Tech 'N Stuff Blog Thu, 09 Jan 2014 18:17:16 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: Perfect Steak Au Poivre | Q and Abe http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-i-introduction-to-low-temperature-cooking-and-sous-vide/#comment-268432 Thu, 31 May 2012 03:05:08 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?page_id=3913#comment-268432 [...] be scared of how pink and bloody the steak is, embrace the juicy delicousness. We follow the French Culinary Institute to make sure we leave our steaks in the water bath long enough to [...]

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-i-introduction-to-low-temperature-cooking-and-sous-vide/#comment-76082 Tue, 16 Aug 2011 14:55:56 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?page_id=3913#comment-76082 Looked at the manual. Looks like it doesn’t have an over-temp safety, which is why they have so many warnings about water level. I’m curious how well the bubbling works to increase forced convection in larger tanks. The main gripe I would have is how hard it is to clean bubbling stones. They appear to use a bubbler similar to the ones I use in aquariums, which throw off grit and would probably get grungy over time –but that is a guess. Price seems good.

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By: E. Nassar http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-i-introduction-to-low-temperature-cooking-and-sous-vide/#comment-76070 Tue, 16 Aug 2011 14:07:37 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?page_id=3913#comment-76070 The Fresh Meals Solution kit takes the whole “using a PID controller with a rice cooker” method to the next level. The kit now actually comes with a PID controller with temp sensor and a submersible heating element integrated with a bubler (for circulation). The bubbler is controlled by an air pump. Here is their user guide if you want to check it out:

http://freshmealssolutions.com/downloads/FMMuserguiderelease6.4.pdf

Those who do have have it had only good things to say about it so far. The main requirement for safe use of this kit is to always make sure the heating element is completely submersed in water (~5 inches). Not a big deal to do. Again, I just want to make sure I am not missing anything that would make this a bad choice over a much more expensive IC. Thanks for all your input Dave.

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-i-introduction-to-low-temperature-cooking-and-sous-vide/#comment-75618 Mon, 15 Aug 2011 17:49:30 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?page_id=3913#comment-75618 Hello E. Nassar,
I’ve never used (or seen) that unit. Tell me how it works. Re the Haake, I haven’t worked on a Haake IC for over 6 years. They work on an RTD, see if there is corrosion on the leads. Check the spade terminals on the inside of the unit as well as the internal fuse terminals (I think the Haake has them, hard to remember) for corrosion. BTW: The number one failure mode for old IC’s is internal corrosion. The second most common failure is the bearings on the motor (aside from physical damage due to immersion or dropping).

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By: E. Nassar http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-i-introduction-to-low-temperature-cooking-and-sous-vide/#comment-75610 Mon, 15 Aug 2011 17:38:21 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?page_id=3913#comment-75610 Sorry, forgot to add one more “symptom” to my previous post. The Haake IC also blew up 2 fuses in the last 2 months.

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By: E. Nassar http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-i-introduction-to-low-temperature-cooking-and-sous-vide/#comment-75596 Mon, 15 Aug 2011 17:23:59 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?page_id=3913#comment-75596 Question to Dave (or maybe to N. Myhrvold for this week’s radio show??):
I have been using an analog Immersion Circulator for about 3 years now. It’s a Haake brand that I picked up on eBay for $100. Recently it started to overshoot the set temp by about 3 degrees Celsius or so (I keep a digital thermometer in there all the time to track the temp). Now, it overall works ok I think and I have been setting the temperature 3 degrees lower than I need it to be. However, I think it might be a time for a change, especially for stuff that needs perfect accuracy like eggs.
1- Any recommendation as to how to fix it if possible?
2- Polyscience is the gold standard for this sort of cooking but it is expensive. I have Modernist Cuisine and they compare several sous vide rigs except for this one: http://freshmealssolutions.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&flypage=flypage-ask.tpl&product_id=39&category_id=15&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=31&vmcchk=1&Itemid=31
For $300 this seems to have it all (accurate heating and circulation), except for good looks maybe :-). Am I missing anything? What do you think?

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-i-introduction-to-low-temperature-cooking-and-sous-vide/#comment-73750 Wed, 10 Aug 2011 14:56:42 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?page_id=3913#comment-73750 Howdy Mayuna,
1. Yes, but the temperature has to be above 54.4 C (a bit lower is actually OK but I don’t have data I can stand behind) if you want to re-chill or if you are going to hold for more than an hour or so.
2. Yes, but make sure the steak wasn’t salted prior to cooking and the quality might not be quite as high.

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By: Mayuna Kobayashi http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-i-introduction-to-low-temperature-cooking-and-sous-vide/#comment-72898 Mon, 08 Aug 2011 05:01:25 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?page_id=3913#comment-72898 >>>Typically you keep several portions warm in the bath (but below the cooking temperature) ready to sear off when necessary. Usually we start retherming a piece of meat 30-40 minutes before we know we have to fire it<<<
Hi Dave, I have a question regarding above answer.
1. "Retherming below the cooking temperature" Let's say the cooking temp. of tenderloin was 138F, then any temp below 138F is okay for retherming?
2. What if you retherm about 10 pieces of steak and you only sell 5 pieces. Can you re-retherm the next day?

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By: kitchengrl http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-i-introduction-to-low-temperature-cooking-and-sous-vide/#comment-15921 Fri, 25 Feb 2011 20:18:06 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?page_id=3913#comment-15921 thanks – funnily enough I was also looking at a Lauda. Prices were low, but I’m not looking to waste money. Maybe I’ll just bite the bullet and buy another polyscience – they’re not that expensive.

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By: davearnold http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-i-introduction-to-low-temperature-cooking-and-sous-vide/#comment-15854 Thu, 24 Feb 2011 23:26:35 +0000 http://www.cookingissues.com/?page_id=3913#comment-15854 You have hit the tough question my friend. Usually, unless the pieces are very thin –like skirt steak, you don’t retherm from cold when it is time to fire the order. Typically you keep several portions warm in the bath (but below the cooking temperature) ready to sear off when necessary. Usually we start retherming a piece of meat 30-40 minutes before we know we have to fire it

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